The Health Problems Our Kids Are Up Against You love your family, and you want what’s best for them, right? For the month of May, we’re taking a look at family health—for members young and old. This week, it’s all about the little ones (and not-so-little little ones). Between the ages of 0-17, a child’s body is rapidly developing, and this crucial time can lead to either a future of good health or poor health. Truthfully, the odds aren’t great; the state of children’s health in America is pretty worrying. Let’s talk about some of the biggest health threats to today’s kids.

Weight Issues

According to the Center for Disease Control, rates of childhood obesity have more than doubled since the 70s. In fact, nearly 1 in 5 school children are considered obese. Obesity during childhood can come with hefty, long-term consequences, including increased risk of heart disease, high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, breathing problems, musculoskeletal issues, and social and psychological problems.

Stress

These days, the kids are more stressed than ever—and sometimes, parents just don’t know. In fact, a survey found that about 1 in 5 kids ages 8-17 report they worry a lot, but in response, only 3 percent of parents reported extreme stress in their children. An alarming detail, because left untreated, stress can take a huge toll on a developing body and mind—think anxiety, depression, sleep disorders, decreased immune system function, high blood pressure and other physical health issues.

Injury Prevention and Management

Your child’s bones are constantly growing, as well as the muscles, ligaments and tendons surrounding those bones—aka, the musculoskeletal system. Whether a clumsy toddler or an athletic teenager, falls, sprains and strains can add up. Accidents and injury can hinder the development of the musculoskeletal system and may set up a child for a future of health complications.

Asthma Symptoms

Asthma has been on a sharp incline in the US over the past 30 years, rising by more than 60 percent since 1980. Today, there are 6.8 million school-age children with asthma, which means an average of three children per classroom. Symptoms include difficulty breathing, wheezing, coughing and tightness in the chest.

ADHD Symptoms

Nearly 6.4 million children between 4-17 have been diagnosed with ADHD—a 53 percent jump from 2001. This condition is most commonly treated with medication which is pretty extreme considering the condition’s high rate of misdiagnosis. ADHD drugs like Ritalin and Adderall have been connected to weight loss, stunted growth and a hindrance in social and creative development.

Stay Tuned, Family—We’re Just Getting Started!

Today we talked problems with the state of children’s’ health in America... this Thursday, it’s all about the solution!

The Health Problems Our Kids Are Up Against