A New Year, A Better You, Part I
With every New Year’s Eve celebration, for most people, it is a time of renewal. Out with the old and in with the new. It’s a brand spanking new year, with new resolutions, new commitments, new promises and, for many, a new you. The challenge is, the only time you’re really new is when you cried with the your first breath of air after leaving your mother’s womb. After that, you spend the rest of your days doing nothing but growing physically older.

If this is true, then wouldn’t it be in our best interest to be straight about it and not lie to ourselves about creating a “new” you? If so, how about controlling something we can influence and not become “new” but better. In our naiveté, we often consider something that is older isn’t as good as something new. As it pertains to us, a “new” you insinuates that the “old” you was not so great to begin with. The problem is, this thought process lacks the acknowledgement of how special and magnificent you are as a unique individual. Our world bombards us with so much negative publicity, news, information and feedback, we tend to focus so much on what’s missing or wrong that we look right past and take for granted the multitude of blessings each of us has. As we get older, the very act of aging brings with it its own inimitable gifts that cannot be achieved with anything other than time and experience.

You’ve been doing your New Year’s resolutions all wrong; here’s why

Age often brings a richer, deeper and broader perspective of our world and our role in it. We gain insight and wisdom into the secrets of the Universe and the folly of it all. We truly become aware of our strengths, weaknesses and idiosyncrasies, and gain power in living full out through embracing all that we are…and aren’t. Unlike the prison of youth, we can stop trying (unsuccessfully) to live into the illusions others impose on us, and live life as a beacon to others, fully expressing the essence of who we are. In this we absolutely become, “better.”

One would like to think this experience would automatically be assigned to the process of growing older, however, the truth of the matter is this rarely happens. As we mature, without a doubt, the classroom of life continually teaches us and gives us the feedback to know if we are mastering the course or not. But going to school and actually performing well are two completely different experiences; most of us, if graded in this class would fail. This is where the saying, “most people die around 25 years of age then take another 40+ years before they’re buried,” comes from—people stop learning the lessons and just endure the drudgery of attending “Life University.”

Stay tuned next week for part two of this series, and learn the “Five Simple Steps” to become “A Better You!”

Believe…

Brett Penager