5 Reasons You Might Be Having Headaches (And How to Stop Them!) Ugh, headaches—such a nuisance, right? A painful nuisance. And if they’re regular, they can ruin a lot more than just a few hours of your day. Instead of popping a pain reliever or trying to weather through the discomfort, maybe it’s time to start looking at why they’re happening instead of how to get rid of the pain. We sat down for a chat with Dr. Jessica Basala, D.C., long-time Chiro One doctor, and got all the best tips and tricks on eliminating headaches by stopping them at their source. Here’s what she had to say!


1. Do you need more water?

According to Dr. Jessica, a good baseline for water consumption is drinking about half your body weight in ounces—for example, if you’re 150 pounds, aim for 75 ounces a day. Does that sound like a little too much for you? Check with your physician! Based on your lifestyle, that number can change.

2. Are you keeping tabs on your diet?

Nutrition and diet can affect the entire body! Keep a food diary and try to identify any patterns between what you eat and what you feel. If you notice you get a headache a few hours after you eat something specific, say dense carbohydrates or sugary foods, consider eliminating or limiting that food.

3. Do you need more oxygen?

As a whole, we’re pretty shallow breathers. Regular pulsing or throbbing headaches are a good indicator that you’re not getting enough oxygen to your brain. Dr. Jessica advises that you take a little time each day to focus on taking ten deep breaths: “Breathe straight from your diaphragm, inhaling deeply and exhaling completely.”

4. Have you checked your posture?

Is your head leaning forward? When the muscles and ligaments in your neck are stressed or strained due to wonky posture, it can cause a headache. Pay attention to how you’re sitting during the day. Set posture notifications on your phone that’ll remind you to straighten it up! Remember, your head should be level with your shoulders—no hunching!

5. Could it be your meds?

Many of us are on different medications, and we don’t consider the side effects. Evaluate your meds even if you think that could be completely unrelated. Read the side effects, and if you suspect that your medication contributes to your headaches, check in with the physician who prescribed them to you.